Mexico Exhibit at the Dallas Art Museum

Yesterday I went to the Dallas Art Museum specifically to see the Mexico Exhibit.

For the summer class I’m taking I also had to visit an art museum, so this trip killed two birds with one stone. I really wanted to see the Mexico exhibit because they had some Frida Kahlo Paintings on display and I love her work. They also had quite a few of her husband, Diego Rivera’s pieces.

The whole exhibit was amazing. They showcased so many talented Mexican artists! The only thing about the visit that wasn’t great was the wait. We waited an hour to see the first half of the exhibit and twenty minutes to see the second half. I’m not an impatient person, so I was willing to wait, and happy to see that hundreds of people showed up to see the exhibit. My chronic pain however is very impatient. By the time we got to see the second half (which was where Frida’s work was) I was in so much pain it was hard to enjoy to the fullest extent. After finding her work I kind of rushed through the rest of it because my feet were hurting so bad. Seeing her work in person was definitely worth the wait and the pain though.

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The Two Fridas By: Frida Kahlo

They had three of her pieces, all self portraits. So many people dressed up as Frida and overall most people were there to see her work. The majority of the people there to see the exhibit were hispanic, which I thought was really cool. Art can often be white-washed and male dominated so it was nice to see such a crowd for Frida.

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By: Diego Rivera

I really like the way her dress looks translucent in Rivera’s painting. This was a painting of one of Rivera’s previous wives, before Kahlo.

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by: Ramon Cano Manilla

The detail in this painting astounds me. All of the vegetation has incredible texture and the dress is so ornate. It must have taken months or even years to paint.

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Alice Rahon

In addition to paintings they had a few sculptures. I found this one particularly fascinating. It’s a metal puppet entitled “The Androgyne.”

I hope I get to see more of Frida’s work in the future and would love to see this whole exhibit again.

Who’s your favorite artist?

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A Day Without A Woman

Today thousands of women across the U.S. are participating in ” A Day Without a Woman” led by the Women’s March Movement as a part of International Women’s Day.

They are asking participants to…

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Of course not everyone is going to be able to take a day off of work. Many of us cherish our sick days/ vacation days and can’t randomly take time off. Wearing red in solidarity, showing support through social media, and having conversations with friends and family is great way to contribute to the cause.

While I don’t have a job to take a day off from and I don’t make many purchases ( I’m a cheapskate) I will be wearing red and talking about women’s rights! Other great ways to celebrate international women’s day are donating to organizations that support women’s/reproductive rights and supporting female artists.

International Women’s Day is a day to celebrate ALL women. Queer women, trans women, women of color, disabled and chronically ill women, religious women, immigrant women, women in poverty, all women. Don’t leave any women out of your celebration or activism!

How are you celebrating International Women’s Day or A Day Without a Woman?

Lots of Love,

Alyssa

 

 

Six Days

We are six days into the nightmare that is a Tr*mp presidency.

Here’s some of what has happened:

  1. He began to repeal the ACA which will lead to an estimated 43,000 deaths annually
  2. He overturned the progress Obama made with the Standing Rock pipeline – in other words he doesn’t care about indigenous people or the basic human right of access to clean water
  3. Stated he is not going to release his tax returns
  4. Attacked the National Parks for their tweets and told them to stop tweeting – or censoring what he doesn’t want to hear
  5. Moved forward with his plan to build a wall between the US and Mexico

 

Unfortunately there’s been more and probably will be more before I even post this. My go-to emotion isn’t sadness, but I am sad, so very sad. I’m sad for myself, I’m sad for my family and neighbors, I’m sad for America. Currently I am not proud to be an American, and the terrible thing is, that statement offends more people than anything he has done so far as President or has said/done in the past.

I’m horrified at what our government has done in the days since the inauguration. On the other hand, I am extremely happy to see the response from some of our fellow Americans. The Women’s march was amazing to say the least, and so inspiring. So many celebrities are taking a stance and encouraging others to do the same. I wanted to go so bad, but I had a doctors appointment that took over a month to schedule so I couldn’t miss it. Even here in conservative Texas we had some large marches, which made me so happy. The march obviously wasn’t enough, but it was a good start. It’s okay to be upset, I know I am, but doing nothing is not okay.

You can go here to let your senators know that the secretary of education pick isn’t okay, because someone who has never been to public school and didn’t send her kids to public school, shouldn’t be in charge of our education system. You can call your senators and let them know on the phone or show up in person, which here in Texas, that is making Senator Ted Cruz very angry.

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If you’re scared, angry, or upset, so am I. He’s gonna do some bad things, I mean he’s already done some bad things, but the only response you can control is your own. Be kind and loving to other people. Stand up for not only your rights, but also those who’s voice isn’t as loud as yours. Giving up is not an option; stand strong!

Lots of Love,

Alyssa

 

P.S. Here are some places you can donate to if you feel so inclined

Planned Parenthood

The Trevor Project

GLSEN

Standing Rock

ACLU

 

Femme isn’t Feminist?

I’ve seen some wacky ideas on the internet that people try to label as feminism.

One of them is that women “conforming” to wearing feminine clothing is anti-feminist. This is almost comical to me, because feminism is about supporting all genders in any way they want/feel the need to express themselves. Yes, feminism has made it more socially acceptable for women to dress in a more androgynous or masculine manner, but it isn’t a requirement to claim the title.

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I usually dress pretty femininely. I wear makeup when I go out most of the time, and in the past I’ve had long hair. I shave my legs, and get my eye brows waxed.  None of this discredits me practicing intersectional feminism. It’s quite silly to think that clothing would determine your morals and values. On the days I dress more androgynously I’m not any more/less of a feminist than the days I wear a dress.

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When I think of people believing that women must only wear dresses and skirts, I think of the 1950-1960’s. In my Grandparents church they had problems just this month with the choir director not letting people join if they wore pants. She claimed the Bible says it’s evil for women “to wear men’s clothes,” FYI that’s not in the Bible. How crazy right? Luckily even though the other members are also super conservative, they let her go of that position because they all agreed that kind of attitude wasn’t okay.

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Wear whatever you want, and whatever makes you most comfortable. It doesn’t matter your gender, sexuality, weight, height, ethnicity, etc. you can wear anything you want. There are no rules when it comes to clothing, it’s just another form of self-expression. If you want to wear short-shorts and low cut tops, do it! If you want to cover up, and dress conservatively, do that! Other people shouldn’t be dictating what you can and cannot wear.

Be authentically you and don’t apologize,

Alyssa

 

 

Rae’s Rules to Remember #69: What feminism is….and what it isn’t — bookmarkchronicles

This is a great description of what feminism is! All of the points Rae makes in this are so important. Defiantly worth of read!

There are a lot of misconceptions floating around about feminism that cause people to think that it’s something that it isn’t. A lot of these people don’t seem to understand that the feminist movement has changed a lot over time. The movement today looks totally different from what it did 50 years ago. It’s had […]

via Rae’s Rules to Remember #69: What feminism is….and what it isn’t — bookmarkchronicles

Miniskirt Misogyny

 

When I was in sixth grade we had a “girls only” assembly to talk about dress code. Before this time it had never been explained to me that the reason we have a dress code is so girls “don’t distract the boys” with our bodies. This infuriated me, and still does. Why is their eduction more important than mine? Why are girls pulled out of class for thirty minutes, because a boy may be distracted by their legs or shoulder blades? More importantly, why is it that boys “can’t control themselves” and girls are shamed for them acting pigs?

I am not a sexual object for just existing as a female. The few times I’ve caught guys staring at me, or making inappropriate comments I’ve felt violated. I don’t exist for your pleasure, and I’m not just something pretty to look at. Now my spit fire attitude and just generally being a lesbian has protecting me from the bulk of the suggestive comments or stares that most girls get. I have a major case of resting bitch face, and overall don’t always look “approachable.” Needless say I haven’t experienced this kind of behavior of men often, but I have had friends who’ve dealt with this a lot.

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Clothing is a form of self-expression. High school is supposed to be a time where you began to “find yourself,” but how can you do that if how you dress or color your hair is constantly being policed. If you find it liberating to wear short skirts and low cut tops, then do it. If you prefer to dress conservatively, then wear the clothes that make you feel comfortable. Showing off your body is not a bad thing, and it doesn’t define you as a person.  A woman is either perceived as a prude if she dresses “too conservatively” or a slut if she shows off her body. But yet society teaches young girls that men want women to show off their bodies. So does she show off her body and get called a slut, or cover up and supposedly get ignored by men? You’re damned if you do, and damned if you don’t.

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Wearing a provocative outfit doesn’t mean a girl is “asking for it.” Assault is assault; it doesn’t matter what the victim is wearing. We need to stop blaming the victims, and start examining the subliminal messages our society sends to us about women’s worth. When a girl tells you she’s been molested or raped, your first response shouldn’t be to ask “what were you wearing”, or “were you drinking?” Consent is necessary in all situations, and clothing does not equal consent.

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As much as I which I could still be in high school, I don’t miss the dress code, or the passive aggressive “slut shaming” assemblies. At least I can wear nike shorts and a t-shirt in my own house without being called a whore. I guess chronic illness does have some perks after all. 😉

Lots of Love,

Alyssa

 

 

Practicing Intersectional Feminism

I consider myself to be an intersectional feminist. I work to look as aspects of feminism from more than my own perspective. For reference I am a teenage, white, middle class, cisgender, chronically ill,  lesbian. I have a lot of privilege, and I try my best to always be aware of it, and use it to help others.

Feminism is for everyone, plain and simple. If you want to hear more about why I identify as a feminist, read this. There is a problem with white women practicing something that has been coined as ,”white feminism.” Essentially white feminism, is believing in feminist values, while only looking through the perspective of being straight, white, female, and cisgender. So  “white feminism” isn’t feminism at all.

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I can pretty easily see the perspective of other queer women, because I am queer woman. I’m aware of the problems our community faces, because not only am I a member, but I also read a lot on LGBTQ+ issues, and try to keep myself informed. I am also chronically ill, so I understand some of the struggles the people face who suffer from chronic illness.  I have people of other genders close to me in my life but I will never fully be able to understand what it is like to be male, trans, or non-binary. I make an effort to understand the problems people of all genders face in society, and do my best to help see aspects of feminism through their eyes.  Being middle class and still dependent on my parents financially, there are a lot of struggles I most likely will never experience. I attempt to examine the problems people who live in low income households face, and fight for their rights to access to better health care, education, and job opportunities. I can only speak for the experiences I have had, but I strive to learn and understand others struggles to the best of my ability.

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Essentially intersectional feminism is all inclusive, and views issues from the standpoint of every race, religion, sex, gender, sexuality, age, ability, and economic status. The term “intersectional feminism” was coined by civil rights advocate Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw. I believe intersectional feminism is the only real “type” of feminism. Intersectionality looks at feminism from every view point, and that’s the only way I feel feminism can truly be effective.

Let me know you’re thoughts on intersectionality, and how you attempt to practice it!

 

Lots of Love,

Alyssa