The Illusion of Health

From commercials to diet magazines and even health class in high school we’re taught that if you eat right and exercise you’ll be healthy.

But what happens when that isn’t true?

The illusion of health is the illusion of control. Living in a world where anything can happen in the blink of an eye is scary and not something most people want to think about. When you’re the one who’s chronically ill though, you don’t get that luxury.

I was twelve when my chronic illnesses started. I spent every evening after school outside and rode my bike all over my neighborhood with my friends everyday. I was active and ate pretty well for a twelve year old. Sick is not synonymous with unhealthy. It’s easy for able-bodied people to point fingers and tell us we’re not doing enough when in reality we’re working harder than them to keep our bodies alive.

I think a lot of ableism stems from fear. Who wants to be reminded that they could one day be the ill one? Instead of seeing us as people we’re seen as some sort of pathetic life lesson or worse inspiration porn. That’s when the “what ifs” come into play. “What if you went gluten-free? What if you tried yoga? Have you seen a specialist? Maybe you should lose/gain weight.” While it’s incredibly insulting, I think all these “suggestions” come from the same fear but with added narcism. People like to believe that if they were the sick one, they could do something about it. They could “heal” themselves because they would try harder. We’re just not trying hard enough, we just don’t want it enough.

A man at my church who was an avid body builder dropped dead a few months ago. He had a heart attack in the gym. “But he was so healthy,” everyone said. Being physically fit does not mean you are exempt from health problems. Tragically he wasn’t “healthy” on the inside and never knew.

Sure diet and exercise can help prevent some health issues that are specifically related to obesity, but at the same time a lot of those issues have a genetic component or are a symptom of a pre-existing condition. Take Type 2 Diabetes for example; The stereotype is that someone with Type 2 Diabetes is over weight and consumes way too many carbs. While this may be true for some people, for others it’s genetic or a symptom of another health issue like PCOS. The same goes for high blood pressure. The stigma around these conditions is so large that we often shame the person for having theseĀ conditions instead of helping them.

Giving your body everything it needs in order to be healthy is important, but it doesn’t mean you automatically get a clean bill of health. Diet culture gives us a false sense of control. Humans are not indestructible and doctors don’t have all the answers. It’s not a fun topic but the idea that you have complete control over your body and your health is quite frankly ignorant.

But ignorance is bliss, right?

 

 

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