Self-Advocating with Chronic Illness

Now I have to admit, this hasn’t always been my strong suit.

I would try to build the courage to speak up and stand firm against doctors when they questioned my symptoms or wanted to start a treatment plan I didn’t agree with but when the time came to self-advocate I found it rather difficult.

I’m definitely more comfortable disagreeing or refuting doctors now than I was at the beginning of my journey, then again I’ve had five years to practice. Doctors are people too, even though society puts them on a pedestal they don’t always get it right. As a patient there are times where it’s your job to say no and put your foot down. It’s so easy to blindly follow a Doctors orders, but that can end poorly quick. Doing your research and getting to know your own body is crucial when chronically ill.

Self-advocating is probably one of the most important things a chronically ill patient has to do. Sometimes you have to push and push to get the adequate medical care you deserve. Other times you’re fighting with the insurance company to try and get them to cover a medication that you desperately need. It’s never ending and exhausting, but so so necessary. Unfortunately with some chronic illnesses many Doctors may not be aware of all the treatment options available or even aware of what the illness entails at all. While it’s always best to see a doctor who’s treated someone with your specific illness before, that isn’t always an option. In those cases you have to be able to self-advocate and teach the health care professionals about what you need.

I have a lot of symptoms that are “weird” or don’t match the other things I deal with. I’ve also dealt with some side effects of medication that are rather uncommon, and instead of listening Doctors and other health care professionals can make excuses or just straight up not believe you. One problem a lot of people with chronic pain run into when visiting the ER is the staff not believing you’re at a certain pain level because you’re not crying or don’t “look like you’re in that much pain.” I personally don’t respond to pain by crying, and unless you know me really well you probably can’t tell by my face how I’m feeling. There is no wrong reaction to pain, but sometimes certain reactions make it more difficult to receive the care you need.

When you’re in the ER or admitted to the hospital it’s always best to have someone there who can help advocate for you. There may be times where you’re too incapacitated to self-advocate and it’s important to have a friend or family member who knows your situation and can help relay information to the doctors and nurses. I know when I’m in extreme pain, brain fog sets in and it makes it a lot harder to explain things and recall everything that’s happened leading up to the ER visit, hospital admission, doctor’s appointment etc. Other times I just don’t have the energy to explain everything or go back and forth with the doctors and nurses.

A big part of self-advocating for your health comes down to confidence. Confidence speaking to strangers and authority figures, confidence talking about your body and uncomfortable things that may come with that, and confidence being honest about how you’re really feeling instead of giving everyone the rose-colored glasses version. For me (and I think most people) confidence will always be a journey. Some days I feel ready to tackle the world and I don’t care what anyone else thinks, and other days I feel insecure. Self-advocating for my health has helped me gain confidence when speaking to authority figures and talking about uncomfortable subjects.

Do you find self-advocating difficult? How do you self-advocate? Let me know!

Lots of Love,

Alyssa

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