In the Beginning… of Chronic Illness

When I first became chronically ill (long before I released this was going to be long term thing) there were cards, flowers, and edible arrangements. One of the biggest revelations I’ve had since getting sick is that people get tired of caring and sympathy runs dry.

Friends leave and family members stop asking how your doing. Teachers stop following your so called “accommodations” and respond with anger instead of understanding when you miss yet another day of school. No matter how hard you try to not talk about it, people won’t want to hear about your illness,  years or even months down the road. The one person you can’t stop caring is you, you don’t get that luxury.

The response to others acute illness always amazes me. In the past few weeks my older brother has had some random severe abdominal pain and my parents freaked out. They both tried to take him to the ER, although he refused on multiple occasions, and a few days ago both my mom and my sister took him. They all thought he had a kidney stone, but diagnostic testing showed nothing. I’m sympathetic to the pain, I offer to help and gave suggestions to ease the pain in the least invasive way I knew how. It does hurt a little bit to see everyone jump and scramble when he has pain for a few hours, but when I’m in constant daily pain it’s no big deal. Acute pain is different, and I know that. When you don’t know whats going on it’s scary… oh wait I know a thing or two about that. I start to forget that this isn’t normal.

I don’t need nor do I want a ton of sympathy or people swooning over me. Would a little more recognition of my pain be nice? Yes of course, but I have a very supportive family and I know their tired of all of this too. They didn’t sign up for doctors appointments, hospital stays, or procedures anymore than I did. I try my best not to complain or talk about it all the time, but it’s consumed my life. Since I’ve left school my whole life revolves around being sick, which isn’t very healthy and I’m trying my best to make some changes, but their aren’t a lot of great alternatives.

When pain meds don’t work, I can’t sleep well, and I don’t leave you house much because of the pain and fatigue, complaining can be the only outlet I have… and I hate that about myself. I was never a complainer before chronic illness and for the past five years of this I really haven’t been at all. These past five months or so however have been really hard emotionally and that definitely plays a role in it. Complainers are annoying, not fun to be around, and I don’t want to be one. Luckily or unluckily for her I guess, I only really complain to my mom so at least not everyone in my life thinks I’m a huge complainer. She probably doesn’t either, but she’s nice to listen to all of it. I hope this is one of those situations where I think I’m complaining a lot but in all actuality I really don’t ; I’m not so sure that’s true though.

We all have things we need to work on I guess.

Lots of Love,

Alyssa

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4 thoughts on “In the Beginning… of Chronic Illness

  1. I don’t know if you’re active on Twitter, but my sister is a major blogger (or whatever they call them) on there and she’s part of a very active disability/chronic illness community. She has always had health issues, but became sick a few years ago and is just now going on full-time disability. You might find some good support there from folks who won’t think you’re just complaining…

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m so sorry Alyssa. When I wound up having to leave my job as a children’s librarian after twenty-six years to go on disability back in 2012, people I really thought were my friends, dropped me. I really have no family to speak of except for my husband, so I’ve become pretty isolated. I have to say Thank God for the WordPress community. Everyone is so supportive and I think I would have lost my mind if I couldn’t discuss books and other things.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I was really surprised to find so many bloggers with chronic illness. I’ve really enjoyed both reading and writing here on WordPress. It gives me something productive to do, and I get to talk to people going through similar experiences, which is cool!

      Liked by 1 person

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