Reproductive Rights & Ohio Abortion Laws

If you haven’t heard Ohio has proposed a bill to ban abortion after a heart beat is able to be detected, which is normally around 6 weeks. At six weeks most people don’t even know they’re pregnant, especially if they weren’t trying to get pregnant. Governor Kasich vetoed that bill, and has instead passed a bill banning abortion after 20 weeks, and charging anyone who performs an abortion after 20 weeks with a fourth degree felony.

Abortion is a touchy subject, and it is one that my opinion has changed on over the years. I used to believe that it was only okay to get an abortion if you were a victim of rape or incest, but I realized that women shouldn’t be revoked of their reproductive rights until something horrific happens. I also believe being pro-choice doesn’t equal pro-abortion. Being pro-choice for me means that I want women to have complete control over their bodies and the right to make those hard decisions if they see it in their best interest. I’m gay, so I’m probably never going to experience accidentally getting pregnant, but I want the right to have control over my body, if something did happen.

The majority of women who get abortions have other kids, or are below the poverty line, so the problem isn’t really teenage girls being irresponsible and not using protection. The problem is with men putting pressure on women to have unprotected sex, when the women know they can’t handle a (another) child or don’t want one. Many people get abortions because they know they can’t afford a child, when they are barely making ends meet as is. People who get abortions aren’t monsters like the media so often makes them out to be. They’re scared women who are having to make a difficult choice, and if you can’t see that, then you don’t have much compassion in your heart.

With this bill, you can still get abortions after 20 weeks if the mothers life is in danger, or the fetus is pronounced “unviable.” The thing is though, that the vast majority of fetuses aren’t even viable until 24 weeks, so the “viability rule” doesn’t make a whole lot of sense.  Why should a woman’s life be in danger for her to make decisions over her own body?

There are many situations when someone may get an abortion well into their second trimester. The father of the baby may leave the mother, or one of the parents looses their job and they know that they can’t afford a child.

I don’t believe abortion should be used as birth control; thats we have many different contraceptive options. Ever since abortions became legal in America the number of abortions has been lowering every year. This lowers as women are able to get an education, get jobs, and have reasonably priced birth control available to them.

With Donald Trump being inaugurated in January, places like Planned Parenthood are in danger. Even if you are “pro-life,” being anti-Planned Parenthood isn’t a logical choice. Only a small portion of what they do is abortions. The majority of what they do is STI screening, mammograms, counseling, and helping people pay for their birth control. If birth control was more widely available at a reasonable price – or even free, then I believe abortion rates would lower. If you ban abortion or make it hard to get one, people aren’t going to stop getting abortions, they will just get them in an unsafe manner, in back allies like women used to. Banning abortion also won’t stop young people from having sex, and neither will abstinence only sex education.

I’m happy Kasich vetoed the bill, but having any laws restricting reproductive rights is a loss in my book. Tell me your opinion below; I’m always open to views that oppose mine, as long as you keep it respectful.

 

Advertisements

37 thoughts on “Reproductive Rights & Ohio Abortion Laws

    1. Wow that was an interesting post! I definitely don’t think the mentally ill should be sterilized. Sure not every person is going to be in a situation where they are capable of caring for a child, but that’s why everyone deserves sexual education. My neighbor has Down syndrome and although I don’t think she’s ever going to be able to live on her own, she has a job, a loving family, friends, and is a productive member of society. You can’t mutilate people just because they have mental illnesses. Many people with mental illness have the capacity to be great parents, but the news and television never show us those stories.

      Liked by 2 people

  1. OK, so I can’t say all I wanted to say (I tried another 5x, chipping away a few small paragraphs, total failure). Let’s say that I totally agree. I also question the accuracy of the numerous translations both Testaments went through before reaching English. That’s a big part of the problem I have with the “Christians” (there they are again! LOL) who say the quotation in the Old Testament that they say condemns same-sex relationships is how they “know” G-d has a problem with same-sex couples. The context of that section shows it’s not the only “abomination” & the definition “abomination,” or its original word, is different now. The times change & we must change with them!! 🙂

    Like

  2. OK, so I can’t say all I wanted to say (I tried another 3x, chipping away a few small paragraphs, total failure).

    Let’s say that I totally agree. I also question the accuracy of the numerous translations both Testaments went through before reaching English.

    That’s a big part of the problem I have with the “Christians” (there they are again! LOL) who say the quotation in the Old Testament that they say condemns same-sex relationships is how they “know” G-d has a problem with same-sex couples. The context of that section shows it’s not the only “abomination” & the definition “abomination,” or its original word, is different now.

    The times change & we must change with them!! 🙂

    Like

  3. I am pro-choice / pro-life in that I don’t think we should be making choices for other people. I don’t think I would ever choose abortion for myself but I did support my sister in her decision when, despite birth control, she found her self pregnant by a recently ex-boyfriend who turned out to be a controlling abusive a-hole. Many times afterwards we were both relieved that she made that decision as ex-bf crossed our paths.
    Nobody “wants” one, life is complicated.

    I kind of think the legislatures propose the extreme bills so they can veto them and then pass the less-extreme ones and people are more understanding of it.

    Like

  4. Brilliantly written! I think your definition of “pro-choice” is what it really means to be pro-choice. It’s right there in the name – choice! I don’t think anyone thinks to themselves, “Hey, I’m bored today. I think I’ll go get an abortion! That sounds like fun!” XD

    I hadn’t heard that the new law allowed for termination after 20 weeks if the fetus isn’t viable. In my opinion, that’s actual a really good addition because there are tests that aren’t performed or aren’t accurate until 20 weeks gestation or later. The reason most women get abortions after 20 weeks is because doctors performed those tests & found that the fetus has a condition/deformity that means its life will be painful & short.

    At the same time, now that I think about it, lawmakers could (& probably will, knowing them) force women to give birth to babies if they’ll live more than a few minutes or hours. Even if they’ll have to go bankrupt with medical bills, put the child through countless surgeries after birth, & still have to watch them die in a few months or years, lawmakers could claim they were viable, so they have to carry them to term.

    I’m guessing they think it’s a compromise, but I think it’s not good enough.

    What infuriates me is that lawmakers base these laws on their beliefs or bad science. Claiming that a heartbeat makes a child is one’s beliefs. Claiming that life begins at conception is one’s beliefs. Claiming that a fetus feels pain at/about 20 weeks is just bad science…. that confirms people’s beliefs, which is why I think they accept it & refuse to believe contrary info.

    Experts have disproven & pointed out flaws in the “pain-capable fetus” study, & the “abortion reversal is possible” study, but lawmakers (most of whom can’t get pregnant) use them as an excuse to limit abortion. Or, they use them to try & talk women out of exercising a constitutional right.

    Honestly, these little laws scare me. They’re chipping away at abortion rights, hoping one day they’ll disappear & it’ll be so gradual women won’t notice. Also, some of them (like lawmakers in Ohio who said in interviews) hope that, with the upcoming Supreme Court change(s), that women will challenge their blatantly unconstitutional law right up to the Supreme Court & the “new court” will overturn Roe v. Wade. 😥

    Sorry my first comment was so long! But, I think it’s an accurate example of future comments (I tend to be way too critical & type/talk too much). 😉 Your post really hit the nail on the head!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your comment! I agree that lawmakers are making “smaller” laws to chip away at our reproductive rights. The future of women’s rights in the hands of our new government also really scares me, but I think women are going to have to be loud and voice their opinion, even though that’s the opposite of what we’re taught to do. I also don’t believe in forcing your beliefs on others, or using twisted versions of any religion as an excuse. I’m glad you checked out my blog!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I agree!! I think they (lawmakers) expect us to remain quiet & meekly accept going back to a country in which one of the biggest life-changing events is out of our control. Then they also want to keep us (& young men) ignorant of the facts about sex with abstinence-only sex ed. & then they want to take away access to birth control for millions of women!! 😡

        I’m right there with you – the new government is a chance for these little laws to start chipping away at women’s reproductive rights, or, even worse, one big law change to overturn Roe v. Wade. Lawmakers in Ohio said so!! They hoped it would be the heartbeat law, but, now that it’s off the table, I’m sure they’ll come up with something equally ridiculous. It’s terrifying.

        But, America is full of young, passionate women who haven’t lived in a world without abortion access. If anything is going to protect our rights, it’s going to be us. 🙂

        I think it’s fantastic that you have your faith, but you don’t believe in forcing it on other people or cherry-picking passages to support biases/prejudices like some people. I was raised in the Jewish faith, & I haven’t read the New Testament yet (I plan to!), so I’m not super familiar with all of Christianity. But, I don’t think the Bible supports these so-called “Christians'” behavior – am I wrong?

        I look forward to reading more of your work. I hope to learn more about Christianity & how your faith impacts your life. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I completely agree. I have been studying the Bible my whole life, and I imagine that God is unhappy with the amount of hate in some people hearts, and those who claim their bigotry is due to their belief in the Bible. Jesus spent the majority of his time on Earth with people who were considered outcast and “unclean.” One of the most popular stories in the Bible is how he healed some men with leprosy, and in those times the lepers were shunned from society. I believe that God wants us to accept and love everyone. As I think I may have written on this blog before, I know the bible to be about justice and love for all people, not just the ones that white, conservation Americans, believe should have rights. Forcing religion on others will never be a good way to show people your love for God. Sharing experiences and talking about how he has impacted my life is how I choose to share my faith. If anyone asks me about faith and my personal journey I’m happy to tell them, or if they want to stop reading as soon as they see the word”God,” thats is also their prerogative. I will never try to force Christianity onto strangers or friends, but I’m always willing to talk about it if someone does has questions.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Oh dear. I hope WP didn’t eat my (again, super long) reply & that it’s just in a moderation queue. Please let me know if you don’t get any other response from me. I’ll try to remember what the heck I was rambling on about! LOL

            Like

          2. Gosh darn it! *angrily shakes fist at WP* My apologies for the strong language. 😉 This is the jist of what I wrote before.

            You’re absolutely right. That’s why I put quotation marks around Christians who use the Bible to justify restricting other people’s rights. To me, they’re like the people who shunned lepers & Mary Magdalene in the Bible. The total opposite of what Jesus said & taught. To me, they aren’t acting very Christian.

            Still, I would never question someone’s faith, regardless of how they act. That’s not my place. Even if they don’t follow Jesus’s teachings, I’ll never know what’s in their hearts.

            What infuriates me is American “Christians” who try – & too often succeed – to use their faith to make laws. It flies in the face of our separation of Church & State. It’s wonderful for people to have faith. But, it’s not OK to use their faith to make laws affecting other people’s decisions – like who to marry or whether or not to have a child. Especially when it’s “Christian” interpretation of the Bible affecting people like me, who don’t have the same faith.

            I’m glad you have your faith. It sounds like it makes you happy & makes you feel fulfilled. I’m also happy that you don’t try to force it on anyone. It sucks that some people rush to judgment instead of reading what you actually think & do with your relationship with G-d.

            It took me one post to realize you weren’t a “Christian.” Unfortunately, they’ve given good people a very bad name. 😥 Still, I think it’s important to hear people out before making judgments. Otherwise, we’re no better than “Christians,” right?

            Liked by 1 person

          3. The amount of “Christians” (as you’ve called them, haha) in America makes me sad. I also try not to call into question others faith, but I know that I can sometimes be judgmental. My passion for civil rights and God overlap, and it’s hard for me to imagine being a follower of Christ and not having immense love for your fellow human beings. I also believe that we should stay true to “separation of church and state.” I don’t want laws based off someone else’s religion, and I know that people who aren’t Christians don’t want laws made based off some conservative white man’s depiction of the Bible. I find it very unfortunate that conservative lawmakers and Christians overlap. I think the correlation between conservative values and Christianity stretches far back to before The United Staes was even founded. To truly live in a “free country,” we shouldn’t limit others based off our own beliefs. I don’t believe living a hateful life is truly practicing Christianity, but they don’t think being pro-choice or pro- gay marriage is right either. Most people are trying to do what they think is right, based off what they’ve been taught, in my opinion. I know that here in the south especially racism is taught, classism is taught, homophobia is taught. Children aren’t born will all this hate; they learn it from their parents. Although that shouldn’t be an excuse, it can be incredibly difficult to teach yourself better. I try to remember to love and respect the people who hate me, or my values, or my sexual orientation. It isn’t an easy thing to do, but responding with hate only makes me as bad as them. When I hear people saying things I find hurtful and offensive, I try to imagine living a life with that much negativity in your heart. I don’t walk around everyday thinking about how wrong their thoughts are, but they seem to be controlled by these hateful thoughts – which I find sad. Thank you for all your comments, they really brighten my day!

            Liked by 1 person

          4. Aww! You’re so welcome! I’m really enjoying our conversation too. From what you’ve said, it sounds like we have a lot of our deepest thoughts & feelings seem to match up. (That may support my theory that religion isn’t the source of morality or world-view, but I wouldn’t want to presume to put that on you. 🙂 )

            I think everyone, no matter how forward-thinking, can still be judgmental. But, like you said, what matters is how you deal with those thoughts & try to make sure the thoughts don’t become actions.

            I’m a lot like you – I try to see situations from other people’s perspectives. I’ll admit, I struggle with people who have such hate, selfishness, & bigotry in their hearts, because I simply can’t imagine being like that.

            When you say that you imagine trying to live with the hate in your heart you see in other people, it makes me feel sorry for them. I try not to even say I “hate” something. I think it gives too much power to someone/something I don’t like. But I know others don’t feel the same. Like you said, hate isn’t innate. It’s learned. That makes me feel even worse for those who have hate in their hearts.

            Still, when they reach adulthood, it becomes a choice, I think. Then again… our childhoods have such a strong influence on us… darn… that’s something I’m going to have to think more about, I believe. Thank you for giving me that to ponder.

            I can’t imagine how rough it must be for you. There’s a lot of hatred for women, especially those who speak for their rights, & LGBT+ people. I experience it to a much smaller degree, much more online than in person, but I have the good fortune to live in a way less conservative state than you do. If you ever need to talk, feel free to comment. I’m here for you.

            A lot of people like to claim that the Founding Fathers created America to be a Christian nation. However, I’ve read a biography of Thomas Jefferson & I’ve seen quotations from other Founding Fathers that disprove that idea. Still, I’m sure some felt differently & I’m sure there was a lot of mistreatment of people who weren’t Christians (or the “right kind” of Christian) in early America. I’m not sure I agree that conservative values affected the U.S.’s creation (unless I’m totally misreading your comment, in which case, I’m sorry!) & I’m not sure it was a factor of the early “factions,” as they were called (we call them “parties” now).

            I understand that some people don’t think being pro-choice or being LGBT+ or letting homosexual marry is wrong. What I don’t understand is Americans trying to limit these people’s rights. It doesn’t affect other people, so why try to take away their rights? If they think G-d is going to punish women who have abortions, LGBT+ people, or same-sex partners who marry, why is it their business?

            Like

          5. I don’t think the conservative values affected the creation of the US, I think they have been alive for far long than the US has, if that makes any sense. I believe that it isn’t our job to decide the sins in others lives, but instead to leave it up to God. Now that doesn’t always stop me from judging others and their actions, but I know that isn’t my job to punish them for their wrong-doings. America was supposed to be a safe haven for those facing religious persecution in Europe, so it makes me sad to see the religious persecution going on here in America. Being a Christian in the south, i don’t have a lot of people telling me what I believe is wrong. It’s more of my progressive values that they hate. I have friends who are Muslim and Hindu, and they face racism and horrible stereotypes all the time. They get accused of being terrorist or pat down at the airport when they haven’t done anything. I think a lot of my morals do come from my religion, but even more than that they come from life experiences that I never want anyone else to have. Seeing things that my family, friends, or myself has gone through has definitely changed my world view and continues to change my world view. I’d be interested to know how you believe you’re morals have come about, since it sounds like religion isn’t a big part of your life. I definitely think people who aren’t religious or subscribe to a different religion from me, can have strong morals and be great people. I’m not really sure where some people have the idea that everyone who isn’t religious is immoral. I don’t think religion makes you a good or a bad person, instead I feel that is the way you treat others and respond to things that happen to you which defines who you are.

            Liked by 1 person

          6. I’m so sorry for misunderstanding what you were saying about early America! I agree, there have always been conservative values since … well, exactly like you said, since before America was its own nation.

            However, I’m not 100% positive the term “conservative values” has always had the same definition. I understand that there’s a strong religious element, but I think in this “information age,” people are less inclined to make their own opinions based on their reading of the scripture.

            But, that could be my own bias talking. I’m not sure. What do you think? Do you think “conservative values” is something that has always been the same, or something that has changed with us?

            That’s awful about your friends. Unfortunately, we’re not immune from it in my state either. I live about about 30 minutes away from NYC, supposed bastion of liberalism. But, we’ve had horrible incidences of bigotry here too. It breaks my heart. Still, I’m sure there are good people where you are from who stand up for the persecution of others – you’re one of them!

            I’m so honored that you asked about my thoughts on morality. I think it’s a very personal experience, much like religion. Now, I’m not saying that religion doesn’t play a part, sometimes. But, I know fantastic people (like, the best people… people who inspire & create awe in me) who weren’t raised with any strong religious background.

            I went to Hebrew school as a child, but… well… I wasn’t really interested in it. I liked the traditions – the singing, the holidays, the food (we had a lot of food in our ceremonies lol). But the religious texts didn’t… I don’t know… hold sway in my heart.

            I feel my own sense of morality developed later… much later… in life. It came from making mistakes – a lot of mistakes. It came from surviving things, much like you say, you wouldn’t want anyone else to have gone through.

            I totally agree. In my opinion, religion forms a personal relationship with one’s G-d. I think that can affect how a person treats others, since many religious texts describe how one should treat others, but, ultimately, it’s a personal choice. One chooses how to treat his/her neighbor, how to treat those different from his/herself, & even which passages on which to put more significant meaning.

            I could call it morality to focus on the passages that talk about when it’s righteous to kill a person in the Old Testament… but that wouldn’t make me a very good person, y’know?

            Liked by 1 person

          7. I think the definition of conservative values has changed over time. Democrats and republicans have flipped values since the original creation of the two parties. With the Old Testament I feel it’s all about context. The context of what happened before and after a certain statement was made and cultural context. When you bring cultural context into play it changes a lot. Women’s roles and marriage were very different then, and I don’t think we are meant to follow those things to a t. The people who wrote the books of the Bible were living in a time where it was acceptable to think of women as property and no one had stepped up to say that it wasn’t okay. I think studying the Bible takes much more than just taking the words of the page literally. There’s a lot to think about and apply logic to.

            Liked by 1 person

          8. That’s very true. Words & what’s acceptable in society change over time. I mean, it has been 2000+ years since the first translation of the Bible was written. & then, we have to think that the Bible (both Testaments) has been translated by multiple people into multiple languages before reaching the English version(s).

            So, how many mistakes were made? How many words don’t translate directly into English & the translator had to choose a “close enough” word? I think about that a lot.

            You’re absolutely right about cultural context too. Women were considered property until pretty recently, at least in some regards. There’s still backlash against feminism today, some of which tries to use the Bible to support it.

            Then there’s the “Christians” (them again! lol) who use the “Man shall not lie with mankind as he lies with woman, it is an abomination. Their blood is on them.” to be anti-same-sex marriage & claim G-d is too. Focusing on that & a somewhat literal understanding of the words without the rest of that section’s context is kinda b.s., in my opinion. Especially when Jesus, as I understand, never said a word about same-sex relations. Also, when we understand that the word “abomination” as used in the Old Testament isn’t the same as it is now.

            We have to understand the changes in our language & meditate on G-d’s underlying message (if we’re so inclined! I’m all for people who have faith, by the way, as long as it’s not forced on me or others lol).

            I know what you mean about the political parties. Stuff changes! We have to change with it!!

            Like

          9. WP really doesn’t want me to reply to you today!! I’ve tried posting my reply 3x now & it won’t “stick!” I wonder if it’s because they’re ridiculously long? Let’s see if this one works…

            Like

          10. Gosh darn it!!!

            That’s very true. Words & what’s acceptable in society change over time. I mean, it has been 2000+ years since the first translation of the Bible was written. & then, we have to think that the Bible (both Testaments) has been translated by multiple people into multiple languages before reaching the English version(s).

            So, how many mistakes were made? How many words don’t translate directly into English & the translator had to choose a “close enough” word? I think about that a lot.

            You’re absolutely right about cultural context too. Women were considered property until pretty recently, at least in some regards. There’s still backlash against feminism today, some of which tries to use the Bible to support it.

            Then there’s the “Christians” (them again! lol) who use the “Man shall not lie with mankind as he lies with woman, it is an abomination. Their blood is on them.” to be anti-same-sex marriage & claim G-d is too. Focusing on that & a somewhat literal understanding of the words without the rest of that section’s context is kinda b.s., in my opinion. Especially when Jesus, as I understand, never said a word about same-sex relations. Also, when we understand that the word “abomination” as used in the Old Testament isn’t the same as it is now.

            Like

          11. Gosh. Darn. It.

            That’s very true. I mean, it has been 2000+ years since the first translation of the Bible was written. & then, we have to think that the Bible (both Testaments) has been translated by multiple people into multiple languages before reaching the English version(s).

            So, how many mistakes were made? How many words don’t translate directly into English & the translator had to choose a “close enough” word? I think about that a lot.

            You’re absolutely right about cultural context too. Women were considered property until pretty recently, at least in some regards. There’s still backlash against feminism today, some of which tries to use the Bible to support it.

            Then there’s the “Christians” (them again! lol) who use the “Man shall not lie with mankind as he lies with woman, it is an abomination. Their blood is on them.” to be anti-same-sex marriage & claim G-d is too. Focusing on that & a somewhat literal understanding of the words without the rest of that section’s context is kinda b.s., in my opinion.

            Like

          12. OK, so I can’t say all I wanted to say (I tried another 5x, chipping away a few small paragraphs, total failure).

            Let’s say that I totally agree. I also question the accuracy of the numerous translations both Testaments went through before reaching English. That’s a big part of the problem I have with the “Christians” (there they are again! LOL) who say the quotation in the Old Testament that they say condemns same-sex relationships is how they “know” G-d has a problem with same-sex couples. The context of that section shows it’s not the only “abomination” & the definition “abomination,” or its original word, is different now. The times change & we must change with them!! 🙂

            Like

          13. I tried to put what I wanted to say into a shorter comment, took out my spacing, a bunch of stuff. WP doesn’t want me to say what I wanna say. I’m going to have to simply say – I totally agree!!!!

            Liked by 1 person

  5. I absolutely agree with everything thing you said. When I was 18 I got pregnant thanks to my Dr. neglecting to tell me that taking an antibiotic could cancel out my birth control. Not only myself and my boyfriend ready to have a child, but I was still living at home with my extremely abusive and alcoholic mother. I shudder to think what she would have done to me if she had learned of my condition. Thankfully there was a Planned Parenthood clinic near us. On what was inarguably the worst day of my life, one which I will never forget, I was treated with kindness and compassion.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That must have been a very hard decision to make, and you are incredibly strong for making that choice. I’m happy to hear that someone who has had this kind of experience agrees with my thoughts. Thank you for reading, I will definitely check out your blog.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. This is a great post! I think this law would have been ridiculous. I agree that abortion should not be the first option for contraceptive but no contraceptive is full proof (I know someone who got pregnant and they were VERY careful) but aside from that there are so many reasons that one may need it. I just don’t think this is fair!

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s